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Dec28
BEST MEDICAL APPS FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS AND DOCTORS ON ANDROID PHONES-LEARN FROM THIS AND USE IT
The Best 15 Free Android Medical apps for Doctors and Medical Students


1. Medscape

One of the most anticipated apps to hit Android, Health care professionals had been waiting eagerly for this comprehensive medical application. Medscape was just recently released on the Android Market and has already become the number one downloaded medical app for the Android platform.

The amount of free content provided by Medscape is absolutely mind numbing and seems to continuously grow with each update. 7,000+ drug references, 3,500+ disease clinical references, 2,500+ clinical images and procedure videos, robust drug interaction tool checker, CME activities, and more.

Medscape is a great drug reference app — but many don’t realize it’s also a mini-textbook packed with protocols for disease pathologies — great for a quick reference and refreshing you medical knowledge. Its not as detailed as the famous Pocket Medicine Red Book — but it does more than an adequate job of providing clinical pearls from the most common to less common pathologies. On top of this, the application has instructional medical procedure videos and pictures.

2. Epocrates

The free version of Epocrates is considered by many to be an essential drug reference. Useful and easy-to-learn features like the pill identifier, several medical calculators, and drug interaction checker make Epocrates a favorite of clinicians and students alike.

Of note, Epocrates recently announced support for the premium versions of Epocrates on the Android platform.

As with other popular and new Android apps, Epocrates is not available for Android users with older operating systems (version 1.5 or older).

3. Skyscape

This app makes our top ten list for two major reasons: First, until recently Skyscape has been the only high-quality all-in-one type app for Android. Many of the quality android medical apps we have reviewed, such as the Red Book and Netter’s Anatomy have worked within Skyscape’s universal app. Second, it’s available on all Android operating system versions.

By all-in-one, we essentially mean that Skyscape offers health care professionals and students access to a robust selection of medical calculators (Archimedes), periodically updated medical news alerts, select practice guidelines, access to paid textbooks (like Netter”˜s), and solid drug reference (RxDrugs) and disease monographs (Outlines in Clinical Medicine).

Users of older Android operating systems who cannot access Medscape and Epocrates will find that Skyscape, which includes RxDrugs, is a fair replacement.

4. Evernote

Evernote is a great organization tool that can be especially useful for health care professionals and students. There are not many quality PDF organization apps on the Android Marketplace, and Evernote shines above most of the paid apps. Evernote allows you to access and read your PDF documents on the go. Other tools, such as notes and image capture allow you to record atypical disease pathology encountered while practicing for your own reference — possibly even a future presentation.

5. Calculate by QxMD

Calculate by QxMD scores major points (and lands in our top 10) for its aesthetically appealing design and smooth user interface. The collection of medical calculators contained in this android app is wide enough in scope to satisfy most generalists and students.

Each calculator in the app progresses through a number of screens, often posing a question to the user to determine the score or value of interest. In contrast, most other medical calculator apps have a single screen with numerous input fields. Although this atypical method requires more clicks, it also enhances the learning experience without markedly slowing the process.

Those keen on referencing medical literature will be satisfied that the developers have included citations and PubMed links in the “More Information” tab

6. MedPage Today

We find that a well-designed medical news app can be the cure for an email inbox full of unread daily news headlines. MedPage Today is both simple and comprehensive in delivering medical news to your mobile device that is relevant to your particular subspecialty interest. Much of the content is partnered with the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine — giving a reassuring sense of legitimacy to the news articles provided. Along with reading articles, CME activities are also presented in text, video, and audio form.

After specifying your interests and preferences, medical news stories from the MedPage Today web site are delivered to the “My News” app screen. Each category menu opens to reveal recent medical news stories in text and occasionally audio formats. It’s simple, clean,

7. Harvard School of Public Health

The Harvard School of Public Health News app is surprisingly functional and useful. We say surprisingly because Harvard isn’t the first school to make an application to push their content, but they stand out amongst their peers for the simplicity, overall user interface, and solid functionality delivered by the application.

The app features news articles from the School of Public Health — however, the articles link to the school website, and it would be nice if the articles were native or customized for the app. But the true functionality comes from the delivery of educational audio and video content. Some of the best minds in Public Health are at Harvard and the multimedia content is rich with useful knowledge.

In these pictures you can see one of the recent audio podcasts by Dr. Milton Weinstein on comparative effectiveness research. His podcast is a great overall summary of the history of comparative effectiveness research and also how it applies to current times, mixed with the current political ramifications ”“ great listening material. The app will even send you notifications when new audio and video content is available. As the pictures show, the application is embedded deeply with Twitter, allowing a dynamic and interactive conversation with the content contained in the app.

8. Monthly Prescribing Reference (MPR)

The Monthly Prescribing Reference (MPR) claims to be “The most widely used drug reference by clinicians.” For the many clinicians who use MPR, this app is a great mobile substitute.

Drugs are classified by treatment category, similar to the print version. Prescribing notes and drug monographs outline useful information for clinical practice.

9. Standard Dictations

The tedious work of internship is both challenging and overwhelming. For those of us who are soon-to-be interns an app like Standard Dictations is a welcomed anxiolytic.

This app has basic templates to read while dictating. Everything from admission orders to discharge summaries, along with numerous exams, procedures, and several different types of H&P formats for different health care settings. Of note, many EMRs offer similar templates. So residents who work with a robust EMR may not have as much need for this app.

10. USPSTF ePSS (electronic preventive services selector)

This is a public health tool provided to health care professionals by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) — from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) — the nation’s lead federal agency for research on health care quality, costs, outcomes, and patient safety.

As you can see from the included pictures, the application allows you to input your patient’s age, along with other key demographic information, and gives you the basic screening and public health information pertinent to your patient. Much of the content is based on the recommendations made by the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF). The app also provides great links to screening calculators and reference tools available on the web.

11. PubMed Mobile

This app is a quick and easy access to PubMed on a mobile device. Those who use PubMed regularly can put this app to good use. As we reviewed before, users can search for and view abstracts on a mobile device. After tagging articles of interest, the user can send article links via email or share articles through social networks. Features added to PubMed Mobile since our review include links to PubMed articles in a browser, and direct links to PubMed Central “PMC Free Articles.”

Health care professionals and students who need to have the latest evidence at their finger-tips (literally) will certainly find opportunities to use this app in a variety of clinical settings.

12. Ob (Pregnancy) Wheel

Some may call an OB Wheel app too specialty specific to make it into a Top 15 list for all health care providers. Nonetheless, many clinicians would find this app useful, such as those working in primary care, the emergency department, and of course, obstetrics. Medical students and residents would find utility with this app when rotating through OB/GYN or the emergency department. Curious mothers and fathers could also put the app to use.

Numerous adjustable preferences and settings, ultrasound exam dating, and dating ordered patient lists make Ob (Pregnancy) Wheel the best among several free and paid OB wheels available on the Android Market.

13. Eponyms

Eponyms are the bane of many students and providers health care existence. Eponyms are medical phrases or pathologies that are named after key people, such as “Beck’s Triad”. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of them, and it’s near impossible to keep them all straight.

This app contains over 1,700 of the most popular Eponyms and is a great resource to both help refresh your knowledge, and to also use as a reference material.

14. Speed Anatomy

If you are looking for a fun, quick-hitting anatomy quiz ”“ or you are interested in learning anatomy in four different languages ”“ then Speed Anatomy is your best bet among free anatomy apps. Unlike Netter’s Anatomy, Speed Anatomy is not an exhaustive atlas of human anatomy, and the drawings are unimpressive compared to Netters. It is, however, a great tool for students who are about to take their next anatomy practical exam. The faster and more accurately you identify structures, the more points you get.

Do not be fooled by the simplicity of the “overview” practice exams (can you identify a vein?); the more specific practice exams (nasal cavity, foot bones, brain, etc.) are difficult enough to challenge any student learning gross anatomy. In sum, this free anatomy quiz is a simple, but challenging supplement to your anatomy textbook.

15. Calorie Counter by FatSecret

This is a great application to use when counseling patients about diet and exercise. The application is extremely powerful, able to look up almost any type of food category ”“ fast foods, grocery store foods, and prepared foods. You can even scan barcodes with your camera and the app can identify the type of food along with allocating the appropriate calories.
DR.D.R.NAKIPURIA ,SENIOR GASTRO INTEST SPECIALIST & HIV/AIDS CONSULTANT
DR.MRS.RANJU NAKIPURIA,SENIOR GYNAECOLOGIST,OBST & INFERTILITY EXPERT
DR.MAYANK NAKIPURIA ,GENERAL PHYSICIAN.

drnakipuria@gmail.com, 09434143550,09832025685, 07838059592,09832025033.,
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