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Jun22
NAMASMARAN VS NAMAVISMARAN DR. SHRINIWAS KASHALIKAR
NAMA is a word used to indicate true self; inseparable from the unifying universal self. Hence forgetting our self or being oblivious to our self can be referred to as NAMAVISMARAN [NAMA (self); VISMARAN (forgetting)].

As we “forget” our true self (NAMAVISMARAN), i.e. undergo a “descent” into our caricatures, we begin to live as our caricatures. We then get segregated into races, philosophies, ideologies, religions, cultures, nations, regions, families and individuals! Latter we descend further by the downward momentum of individualization and into pettier and meaner life!

This universal process of NAMAVISMARAN manifests in the form of individualistic and often antisocial whims, fancies, idiosyncrasies, delinquencies, perversions, family disputes, quarrels; and world wide spate of antisocial activities leading to dissipation, dispersion, disruption, distortion, decomposition, disease, degeneration and destruction.


Since the root of the individual and universal problems lies in the universal process of NAMAVISMARAN, the panacea for the radical measure for the cure and prevention of the individual and universal problems; lies in reversal of the prevalent universal process of NAMAVISMARAN through active practice and promotion of universal process of NAMASMARAN.

Individual and universal blossoming would begin with the polarization of us; the inhabitants of the world; into those who dedicate themselves to practice and promote NAMASMARAN; and those who ignore, neglect, avoid, doubt, suspect, resist, condemn, ridicule, suppress and oppose NAMASMARAN either actively or passively (by remaining inert and idle).

The latter also would get the chance to practice and promote NAMASMARAN and individual and universal blossoming because of global momentum; though after varying trials and tribulations.


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