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Sep11
Stretch marks
The medical for stretch marks is "Oestriae atrophic" which tabor's medical dictionary describes as fie pinkish- white or gry lines, usually 14cm in length, seen in part of the body where the skin has been stretched. Commonly seen on thighs, abdomen, and breasts of women who are or have been pregnant, in persons whose skin has been stretch by obesity, tumor, or dropsy, or in persons who have taken for a prolonged period.


This is different from cellulite, which is a dimpling of the skin caused by a thin upper layer of the skin with large, irregular fat cells below. Stretch marks are, however, somewhat related to cellulite in that women are much more susceptible than men due to skin anatomy. Women have more subcutaneous fat, which has less of a cohesive cellular structure and also tend to have a thinner top layer of skin which makes the superficial skin more to damage of all kinds.


The top layer of skin and the underlying fatty layer are constructed mostly of fats. Besides eating good fats to preserve skin integrity, use plenty of Vitamin C. Vitamin C is the primary nutrient in connective tissue repair. Skin is the largest and thinnest connective tissue organ of the body and uses a high percentage of the available vitamin c for upkeep and repair. Vitamin C is very safe in doses high enough to cause loose stool, at the point you're wasting nutrients, so cut back to a dose that normalizes the stool. This is called taking vitamin C to bowel tolerance fats would be ideally from fresh-baked, broiled or steamed fish, or plant sources such as olive, flax, and safflower. Avoid margarine, fatty meats including lunch meats and canola oil. Avoid mass-produced baked goods, which tend to use poor quality fats.


The best approach to stretch marks is, of course, prevention. Keep in mind that skin quality is at least 50 percent genetics, and some women are more prone to stretch marks just because of hard-wired information inherited from parents and grandparents. If your family history points to a greater possibility for stretch marks, you should apply the prevention tactics described below as faithfully as possible.


As with all prevention approaches to optimal health, good food is critical. Minimize red meat and other saturated fats, avoid caffeine and excessive alcohol, get lots of greens and fresh fruits, plenty of pure water, and of course, regular moderate exercise. Balancing work with play is essential. Don't forget to sleep. America's most ignored vital nutrient. Please don't skimp on sleep. The best approach to stretch marks is, of course, prevention. Keep in mind that skin quality is at least 50 % genetics and some women are more prone to stretch marks just because of hard-wired information inherited from parent and grandparents. If your family history points to a greater possibility for stretch marks, you should apply the prevention tactics described below as faithfully as possible.


As with all prevention approaches to optimal health, good food is critical. Minimize red meat and other saturated fats, avoid caffeine and excessive alcohol, get lots of greens and fresh fruits, plenty of pure water, and of course, regular moderate exercise. Balancing work with play is essential. Don't forget sleep, America's most ignored vital nutrient. Don't skimp sleep.


Skin Brushing :


Daily brushing of the entire skin surface with a stiffy, dry, skin brush is a Scandinavian beauty secret. Skin brushing takes off the top layer of dead cells. First thing in the morning, firmly stroke the brush over the skin towards the heart. Start with the feet, moving up the legs, be extra firm around the thighs and buttocks. Gentler on the belly, move in a clockwise direction as you look down at your navel, this is the direction which waste travels out of your body in the colon. Use the long handle to get the whole back. Gently up under the breasts and down the neck and throat. Go up the arms starting from the hands. with time, the skin becomes healthier and much less susceptible to irreversible stretching.


Contrast Hydrotherapy:



The alternating application of hot and cold water to the skin is a fundamental health tool for naturopathic doctors and, hopefully, their patients. Hot water encourages blood flow to the skin, cold contracts the tiny vessels, pushing excess fluid or debris into the natural garbage collection system of the body, the lymphatic channels. The basic approach to contrast hydrotherapy is bathing in warm or hot water, then chasing with cold. Ideally, the temperature differential would be at least 60 degrees F. The treatment must end with cold water, and kames sure to get under the armpit and the groin area. Also, turn around to reach to kidneys which are protected by the lower ribs in back, to encourage waste elimination.


Not losing or gaining weight quickly:


This is usually the reason stretch marks occur. You can improve the elasticity of the skin with a good diet, vitamin C, vitamin E and the skincare measures described above, but preventing skin stretching is best. Pregnant women should be prepared to gain 25 to 40 pounds slowly and steadily and take a full 9 months to regain their pre-pregnancy weight. Crash diets are notoriously bad for the skin and they don't work for permanent weight loss either.


Vitamin E topically and by mouth:


Personally, attribute getting through pregnancy with not a single mark on the belly to high-quality Vitamin E. I slathered it on daily the third trimester, and sporadically before that, from neck to knees, ingested 400IUs of vitamin E daily throughout the pregnancy, always breaking open the gel cap with teeth and letting the oil start to absorb right in my mouth, tossing the empty gel cap. I learned this trick from a nutrition instructor if you can possibly chew your supplements like food, the thousand or nerve receptors in the mouth single the brain what's coming down the pike, and start to prepare the digestive tract with the proper enzymes for optimal digestion and absorption.



Fact on stretch marks:


- Stretch marks are long, narrow streaks or stripes that occur when the skin is stretched too quickly.

- Pregnancy, puberty, and rapid weight gain call all cause stretch marks.


- There is little medical evidence available confirming the effectiveness of current treatments for stretch marks.

- Stretch marks often fade over time without treatment and do not pose any serious long- term health risks.


What are stretch marks??


Stretch marks are scars or disfiguring lesions. They are also called striae, striae distensae, striae atrophicans, and striae gravidarum.


The most common areas affected include:


- Abdomen

- Breasts

- Hips

- Flank

- Buttocks

- Thighs


Stretch marks are not physically dangerous but can cause problems with self-image and anxiety, for some people, stretch marks are a significant cosmetic concern that can affect day-to-day living.


Signs and symptoms:


Before stretch marks begin to emerge, the skin can appear thin and pink, it may also feel irritated or itchy.


The marks initially develop as wrinkly, raised streaks that can be red, purple, pink, reddish-brown or dark brown, depending on skin color. The streaks eventually fade and flatten and tend to change to a silvery color over time.


Causes and risk factors:


Extreme skin growth or shrinkage can cause stretch marks, common causes of skin stretching include:


- Pregnancy: Between 50 and 90 % of women who are pregnant experience stretch marks during or after birth.


- Puberty: Rapid growth is typical in young people going through puberty. This can lead to stretch marks.


- Rapid weight gain: Putting on a lot of weight in a short of time can cause stretch marks.


- Medical conditions: Certain conditions can cause stretch marks, such as Marfan the skin tissue, and Cushing's syndrome can lead the body to produce too much of a hormone that leads to rapid weight gain and skin fragility.


- Corticosteroid use: Prolonged use of corticosteroid creams and lotions can decrease levels of collagen in the skin. Collagen strengthens and supports the skin, and a reduced amount can increase the risk of stretch marks.


The skin consists of three key layers. Stretch marks form in the dermis, or middle layer, when the connective tissue is stretched beyond the limits of its elasticity. This is normally due to rapid expansion or contraction of the skin.


As the body grows, the connecting fibers in the dermis slowly stretch to accommodate alow growth. However, rapid growth leads to sudden stretching. This causes the dermis to tear, allowing deeper layers of skin to show through.


This can form stretch marks and contributes to the way they look.


Stretch marks eventually fade to a silvery, white, or glossy appearance, due to the pale fat beneath the skin becoming visible instead of the usual blood vessels.


They are more likely to develop and become more severe where there are high levels of circulating cortisone, or when cortisone is applied to the skin. Cortisol, the stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands, is converted into cortisone. This weakness elastic fibers in the skin.


Risk factors:


A number of risk factors have been associated with the development of stretch marks, but the evidence varies. More research is needed to confirm the causes of stretch marks.


The risk factors for developing stretch marks could be linked to:


- Family history

- Chronic diseases

- Body mass index (BMI) before pregnant

- Birthweight of the child in women who are pregnant


These finding can be explained by the greater degrees of skin stretching in obese women with larger babies and by age-related changes in skin collagen and connective tissue that affect the likelihood of tearing.


Diagnosis:


Stretch marks are easily diagnosis based on a skin examination and a review of a person's medical history.


The doctor will usually ask questions based on signs and symptoms, as well as any medications currently being used or existing medical conditions.


Stretch marks are not harmful and do not cause medical problems. In rare cases, they may indicate an underlying medical issue that requires treatment or monitoring.


Prevention:


Stretch marks cannot always be prevented. However, the following steps may help to reduce the risk:


- Maintain a healthy weight

- Avoid yo-yo dieting

- Eat a balanced diet rich in vitamin and minerals. Consuming a suitable amount of vitamin A and C can help support the skin, as well as the minerals zinc and silicon.

- Aim for slow and gradual weight gain during pregnancy.

- Drink six to eight glasses of water every day.


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